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John Birks Gillespie (Cheraw, Carolina del Sur; 21 de octubre de 1917-Englewood, Nueva Jersey; 6 de enero de 1993), más conocido como Dizzy Gillespie, fue un trompetista, cantante y compositor estadounidense de jazz.. Gillespie, junto con Charlie Parker, fue una de las figuras más relevantes en el desarrollo del bebop y del jazz moderno. paper bag, an act that inspired fellow musicians like Bill Doggett to Although Parker became famous as an alto saxophonist, he was During this time he also appeared on television shows such as Sesame Street and The Cosby Show. A large part of the Earl Hines band departed in 1943 to form a new group headed by Billy Eckstine. Does Jerry Seinfeld have Parkinson's disease? Education: Attended Laurinburg Institute. He had taught himself piano and used the instrument to experiment with new melodies and chord changes. When Gillespie was ten, his father died and left the family in terrible Dizzy Gillespie was born on October 21, 1917 and died on January 6, 1993. Contemporary Musicians. Billed by jazz critics as "the greatest jazz concert ever," it was recorded by Mingus and later released on Debut Records. Rhythm and phrasing, however, were also important to the new jazz style. Jazz from Paris, Verve, 1957. Gillespie passed away Despite economic woes, he was able to keep this band together for four years. ." Starting in 1932, Gillespie studied harmony and theory at Laurinburg Institute, in Laurinburg, North Carolina, but in 1935 he broke off studies to move with his family to Philadelphia. "Gillespie, ‘Dizzy’ Dizzy Gillespie. In 1939 the most in-demand trumpet players for recording dates in New York were Eldridge, Shavers, and Buck Clayton. group to play at the newly opened Onyx Club on 52nd Street. We had a special way of phrasing. In 1956 Gillespie's integrated band became the first to tour overseas under the sponsorship of the U.S. State Department, and in the following years he took the band on tours to the Middle East, South America, and Europe. played the trombone, but switched to the trumpet after borrowing a Gillespie wrote in his memoir, "It was the best job that you could possibly have, high class." Visitó con su música numerosos países y apadrinó a músicos de muy diversas nacionalidades que en varios casos llegaron a adquirir renombre. En 1986, donó una de ellas, una Silver Flair de la marca King, al National Museum of American History. . [cita requerida]. Gillespie's composition "Manteca" (1947) and his performance of George Russell's "Cubana Be, Cubana Bop" (1947) were among the first successful integrations of jazz and Latin music, followed later by his composition "Con Alma" (1957). Hill probably liked Gillespie’s style, which was similar at that time to Roy Eldridge’s; Eldridge had left Hill’s band to join Fletcher Henderson. Gillespie made his first recordings with the Teddy Hill Orchestra just prior to leaving on a European tour with a revue that featured talent from Harlem’s famed Cotton Club. During this period Gillespie continued to play all-night He began playing piano at the age of four and received a music scholarship to the Laurinburg Institute in North Carolina. He wrote in his memoir, “It was the best job that you could possibly have, high class.” Calloway played the Cotton Club and toured extensively. Former Hines members who joined Eckstine included Sarah Vaughan, Gillespie, Parker, and others. whenever he could since 1940, the year he married Lorraine Willis. Gillespie was fourth on the list, but somehow managed to land a recording date with Lionel Hampton, which resulted in the famed “Hot Mallets” session. Cred…, Hampton, Lionel "The opening of the Onyx Club represented the birth of the bebop era," Gillespie recalled in his book, To Be or Not to Bop. En ese encuentro nacía el bebop, con recordados espectáculos en el bar Minton's. Dizzy Gillespie: The BebopYears, 1937–1952. When Gillespie was in the Frankie Fairfax band in Philadelphia he carried his new trumpet in a paper bag, an act that inspired fellow musicians like Bill Doggett to call him "Dizzy." That’s the way it happened.” Gillespie played with bands in Philadelphia from 1935 to 1937 before moving to New York. Gillespie joined the Cab Calloway (1907–1994) Orchestra in 1939 When Gillespie was in the ." In 1989, the year he turned seventy-two, Dizzy Gillespie received a Lifetime Achievement Award at the National Association of Recording Arts and Sciences' Grammy Award ceremonies. Gillespie became musical director for Eckstine, whose backers got him a job on 52nd Street. By most accounts, however, Gillespie was completely innocent and had been set up. Gillespie, Dizzy, and Al Fraser. help but notice his radically fresh take on solo (single) trumpet In addition to his virtuosity on trumpet, Gillespie continued to display his masterful sense of humor and instinct for gleeful mis-chief. Gillespie made his first recordings with the Teddy Hill Orchestra just prior to leaving for Europe with "The Cotton Club Show.". Gillespie began playing trumpet at 14 after briefly trying the trombone, and his first formal musical training came at the Laurinburg Institute in North Carolina. Although Parker became famous as an alto saxophonist, he was playing tenor sax at that time. Parker y Gillespie, ambos considerados grandes genios del jazz, siguieron caminos separados: Parker fue inigualable en pequeñas formaciones, más tarde quedó marginado por su inestabilidad emocional, sufriendo una muerte prematura; Gillespie ofreció lo mejor de sí frente a grandes formaciones, convirtiéndose en una de las figuras más reconocidas del jazz. While Gillespie himself acknowledged the paper bag incident, but he said the nickname didn't stick until later. While the two later reconciled and remained friends, Gillespie was forced to leave the band. Koster, Piet, and Chris Sellers, Dizzy Gillespie, Volume 1: 1937-1953, Micrography, 1986. John Birks Gillespie, or "Dizzy," as he was later known, was born in Cheraw, South Carolina. Fifty years after helping found a new style of revolutionary jazz that came to be known as bebop, Dizzy Gillespie's music is still a major contributing factor in the development of modern jazz. Gillespie first met Parker in Kansas City, Missouri, in 1940 when he was on tour with Cab Calloway. The last of nine children, This well-known incident illustrates the flip side of Gillespie’s jovial personality; he often found himself in situations where he might need to defend himself, and was fully prepared to do so. New Grove Dictionary of Jazz, Macmillan, 1988. Eldridge was in a direct line from Louis Armstrong, and he was the voice of that era, the thirties. Not only did we change harmonic structure, but we also changed rhythmic structure. During this time Gillespie continued to record, both with small groups (Swing Low, Sweet Cadillac, 1967) and with big bands (Reunion Big Band, 1968). Gillespie made his first recordings with the Teddy Hill included Sarah Vaughan (1924–1990), Gillespie, Parker, and He would also sit in with bands; while jamming one night with Chick Webb's band at the Savoy Ballroom, Gillespie met Mario Bauza, a Cuban trumpeter who introduced him to Latin rhythms. When he began to play the trumpet, he puffed out his cheeks, a technical mistake that later became his visual trademark. Calloway played the Cotton Club and toured extensively. Before Gillespie there was New Orleans musician Buddy Bolden—the earliest known jazz cornetist—who was followed by King Oliver, Louis Armstrong, and Roy Eldridge. Gillespie became musical director for Eckstine, whose backers got him a job on 52nd Street. Not letting age slow him down, in 1989 Gillespie gave three hundred performances in twenty-seven countries, appeared in one hundred U.S. cities in thirty-one states and the District of Columbia, headlined three television specials, performed with two symphonies, and recorded four albums. Feather, Leonard, The Encyclopedia of Jazz in the Seventies, Horizon, 1976. Gillespie "The opening of the Onyx Club represented the Contemporary Musicians. Now (With Al Fraser) To Be or Not To Bop: Memoirs of Dizzy Gillespie, Doubleday, 1979. Naturally Calloway assumed Gillespie was responsible. In 1989, the year he became 72 years of age, Dizzy Gillespie received a Lifetime Achievement Award at the National Association of Recording Arts and Sciences' Grammy Award ceremonies.

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